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20121112
20121120
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KQED (PBS) 22
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English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
. that's the bold call today from the international energy agency. fueling that energy renaissance: a boost in oil and shale gas because of new technologies like fracking. the group also expects the u.s. will be a net exporter by 2030, meaning we'll sell more oil than we bring in. right now the u.s. imports 20% of its energy needs. >> susie: so our word on the street tonight is "oil". joining us, gregg greenberg, reporter at the street.com. hey, gregg, i know you have been talking to a lot of oil experts today. it's kind of hard to imagine the u.s. after all these years being energy independent. what were they telling new what did you hear? look, scsi, the trend is certainly favorable. it's nice to hear we are producing more energy here in america and much greater than the reverse but i have to take reports like this with a grigg grain of salt. we have been hearing about peak energy for a long time, hearing about saudi arabia's reserves for a long time and you have to take it with a haley dose of skepticism, good news then again you have to be a little bit keptic. >> susie: all rig
by financial and energy groups. now, after the closing bell, the focus was on cicso systems. the internet gear maker reported its quarterly results late today. and those results were two cents better than estimates. net sales were up from last year, too, and higher than expected. c-s-c-o has been undergoing a restructuring for the past year, managing uncertain demand for its telecommunications equipment's pinched profit margins. the stock was flat before tonight's earnings report. shares were up about 4% in extended hours trading. now, as erika reported earlier, home depot's strong third quarter earnings and optimistic outlook really helped drive buying interest. today's 3.6% rally came on more than double its usual volume, and takes the stock to its highest price since 1999. but the buying interest did not extend to home depot's main rival, lowe's. lowe's shares were essentially unchanged even though volume was slightly heavier than average. home depot wasn't alone in reporting strong earnings. dick's sporting goods boosted full-year outlook after a better than expected quarter. shares added
billions of dollars. and that money's going to go towards energy efficiency and it's going to go towards helping homeowne homeowners, rate payers. >> why doesn't the state say stop polluting instead of selling you permission to pollute? >> the cap will come down. the overall greenhouse gases emissions will come down. they don't care where the cuts come from. some companies will pollute more than others. >> so the auction isn't legal? what was it? >> yes, they were challenging the state's right to collect revenue from selling allowances. they're not against the cap and not against the trading is what they say, it's the state making money from it. >> so couldn't that be where maybe we see the two-thirds less play of the majority in sacramento? couldn't they say, fine, it's not a fee, it's a tax? then the money could go to anything? >> it's a lot of money. it certainly is. billions of dollars, you know, over the years. some of it is ledgislated already. some are already impacted by pollution. some of it will have to be spent there. >> when you say it's billions of dollars, what do you mean
things. you need great intellectual energy and physical energy. petraeus is the first guy since world war ii the public has known. the irony, it to me -- one of the surprises to me in writing this book is the people we lionize, the soldiers of world war ii, they were the people became the generals of vietnam. the we rightly demonized. they're the same men. the difference is, world war ii, there was accountability. in world war ii, success was rewarded, the failure was punished. nobody knows -- first american commander in the african european in the army in world war ii. he was fired. a bunch of other generals were fired. they were replaced by names -- in 1940, dwight eisenhower was lieutenant-colonel on the west coast. george marshall picked him out and said that is the type of guy i need and began promoting these guys. we do not have leadership these days. instead, we have a parade of generals go into iraq. mediocrity, not doing much. coming home feeling entitled to a promotion. that is what has happened to the military over the last 50 years. tavis: what is at the epicenter of this -- 1
energy prices. without food and energy, core inflation was up two tenths of a percent. on wall street, the dow fell 28.5 points, the nasdaq was down almost ten, and the s&p 500 dropped two. if you want to know how the economy is faring, it pays to keep an eye on walmart. after all, it has over 10,000 stores across the globe, selling more than $1 billion worth of stuff every day. it earned $1.08 per share in the third quarter, a penny more than estimates, and up 11% from last year. but revenues were a little shy of forecast, and walmart's outlook for this quarter was less than anticipated. compare that to rival target's quarterly earnings-- four cents better than expectations at 81 cents a share and a holiday outlook that didn't disappoint. erika miller reports on what the results say about all-important the holiday season. >> reporter: $3.6 billion. that almost unthinkable number is what walmart earned in the third quarter alone. it works out to about $40 million in profits a day. to wall street analysts, it's proof the company's turnaround strategy is working. >> what walmart does so
dollars more a year to california. half of that money is going in the first five years to renewable energy projects, energy efficiency projects at schools. going to create a lot of jobs. and its chairman who put $29 million into it is probably going to be a novembcandidate f governor. >> or cabinet. >> why proposition 38 went down? the other education -- >> well, i think part of it was the amount of money that the teacher's union sent against it. and the governor coming out, saying, look, we just have to get this done. but it went down by a greater margin than i thought. there were a lot of people who voted for both, sort of hinging their bet. and i think there was a lot on the ball lot for all voters and i thought to a large degree they seemed very thoughtful. >> and to paul's point, a lot of people would have had to pay under the munger legislation. >> everybody. >> where at some of the others, i'm not in that category. >> belva: turning back to the national scene, we're going to see some changes in the new administration in washington? >> well, there are some californians, we talked abo
are missing and about a dozen are injured after an explosion today on a black elk energy oil and gas platform, according to the u.s. coast guard. a fire started when sparks from a torch hit a storage tank on the platform. the platform is located in shallow water about 25 miles off the coast of grand isle louisiana. the houston-based company says about 16 barrels of oil leaked and that it was not producing oil or gas when the fire started. last month black elk announce plans to start drilling about 20 new wells in the gulf of mexico. >> susie: j.p. morgan and credit suisse will pay more than $400 million combined to settle claims stemming from mortgage bonds gone bad. the securities and exchange commission accused the two of mis-leading investors in bonds backed by home mortgages. j.p. morgan will pay $297 million. credit suisse's fine is $120 million. neither bank admits nor denies the claims. most of the allegations centered around the banks keeping cash they were paid by mortgage originators when loans went bad, instead of passing those payments along to investors in the mortgages. >> tom:
to do both. yes, we need these market incentives on the one hand to encourage renewable energy. but we also need a government that's willing to say no. no, you can't mine the alberta tar sands and burn enough carbon that you will have game over for the climate as james hansen has said. >> but i'm one of those who is the other end of the corporation. i mean, we had a crisis in new york the last two weeks. we couldn't get gasoline for the indispensable vehicles that get us to work, get us to the supermarket, get us to our sick friends or neighbors. i mean, the point i'm trying to make is we are all the fossil fuel industry, are we not? naomi klein: you know, we often hear that. we often hear that we're all equally responsible for climate change. and that it's just the rules of supply and demand. >> i have two cars. i keep them filled with gasoline. >> i think the question is if there was a fantastic public transit system that really made it easy for you to get to where you wanted to go, would you drive less? i don't know about you, but i certainly would. >> i mean, i use the subways all
. but there are a lot of unknowns. when you do theatre. and the energy of what it is you are in, you don't know where it can go. if someone can yell something out or you know... i remember one time we were doing something and would you notice someone in the front row, like there was a whole story. you were probably brought here by a secretary. >> rose: some lady in the front row just went "oh, gosh." >> what did she say. >> which moment was t i can't remember but i said something and she was like oh god, you could see where this is going and was like oh god. >> or sometimes the father gets a hiss like if he says something to me. >> rose: does it bother you at all? >> it's sort of an indication of where they're at, you know, that flock of birds out there. >> yeah. >> somehow becomes of one mind, you know. >> the mob mentality. >> rose: in the world that we live in now, there's all kinds of blogs and if you do what i do and are on conversation every-- television every day, morning, noon and night, you get a lot of people. and someone said to me so wisely once they said not about me, i was looking at th
, actually. even though it was near the end, it's sort of took on the a whole if serial energy. he could feel a lift in yourself. and in the auditorium. however, that had been the case and some of the other numbers that preceded it. some of the numbers had real high points. but that, i was just flying. >> next month, you, robert plant, and john paul jones will be given the kennedy center award for your contributions to american culture. that is quite an accolade. how does that feel? >> well, it is a terrific honor, isn't it? the fact is that all three, all four of us were so influenced by american music, and to me, the music that i was hearing in the 1950's over here, whatever was kicking off the rock and roll movement over here in the 1950's would not have existed without american music, really. we all owe a tremendous debt to it, really, this whole movement, the people, the rest of it. american music. >> when you get the kennedy center medal in december, you'll be introduced to president obama. >> yes. >> if you have a little chat with him about american music, how will that go? >> uh, i di
's got so much going on i can concentrate on my own -- people were giving him energy. now the players go hang on a minute. he's got enough to deal with. i know his swing is this and that and he can't play like he used to. i'll use that 10% of energy i was worrying about him where he was in the lead. i worry about myself now. and these youngsters have, like -- have got the freedom too go and play and they've had the opportunity to beat tiger and they more than likely will keep it. >> rose: if you were 21 today and in good as health as you've ever been, whose swing would you like to have? >> well, the best -- i mean, adams god. >> rose: what makes adam scott -- >> well, again, back to fundamentals. great grip, great posture, great takeaway, great body movement. the kids now have this wonderful -- we use track man. >> rose: kids like people like adam scott, rory mcelroy. >> well, i'd go to 15. these kids now have the knowledge where we did -- we were the pioneers of this knowledge. we didn't know how hard to train could you lift weights to train, what could we eat on the golf course? the fi
control of many events, many characters and the energy in the book is deployed with genius. >> rose: you are not unaware to use the double negatives other have before have adapted it to movies and plays, what is the challenge for you? how did you approach this? >> well, in fact, there have been, as you know, a dozen anna kareninas, probably. my approach was to just see what was for me central, which was love in infinite variety but certainly several manifestations, provide different threads through the book, there are choices to be made among the characters of lesson and kiki. >> there is a lot of stuff going on in the book about tolstoy's preoccupation with agriculture, with the philosophy of life and so on, and i just kept picking up on love, love between brothers, love between lovers, love between mother and child, and tried to make a point of that, really, which in a way simplified my task and there was less missing from such a big novel as you might suppose in the movie. >> rose: so nertsz you feel like you really got the essence of that, if your focus is on the love you have got t
in the world. >> but one of the reasons that there is so much energy in the u.s. is because we embrace individuals in this country in a way that isn't always done throughout the world. so when you look at something like silicon valley is a great-- where amazon is in seattle but silicon valley is kind of the heart of the internet tech. >> rose: i think of them often as one, silicon valley and seattle. >> you look at silicon valley and it's a place where entrepreneurs are celebrated. where somebody with a good idea can quickly raise money and get started. you go to a lot of other places in the world and the idea of celebrating the entrepreneur, celebrating the individual with an idea, that kind of, you know, the two kids in the garage or the-- or in their dorm room, this is one of the best places in the world for that and that's a cultural thing that is very persistent. >> that is why they all beat a path to silicon valley when they come to america. >> if you are worried about the issue that you brought up, there's a very simple solution which is we do something which from a policy point
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)